Ethics, Philosophy

An Introduction to Reformed Scholasticism

Taught by Dr. Michael Lynch
Runs 9/26 – 12/10/22
$225.00 – $399.00

 

Although prior generations of historians were prone to denigrate scholasticism in the early modern period, including the scholasticism of the Reformed tradition, recent historiography has begun to rehabilitate its legacy. Taking a decidedly appreciative approach, this course will explore early modern scholasticism more generally, as well as the particular species of Reformed scholasticism.

Deadline to register: Wednesday, September 14th

 


 

ENROLLMENT OPTIONS

Auditing ($225):

participate in readings and live class sessions, but no graded assignments and no course credit

Full course (Full-Time Discount) ($275):

for-credit courses (at least four per term) toward our Certificate or M.Litt in Classical Protestantism

Full course ($399):

individual classes on a for-credit basis; you can later apply them toward a Certificate or Degree

 

ENROLL NOW

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Description

This Christian History course will be taught by Dr. Michael Lynch, and will run from September 26th through December 10th. The syllabus is available here.

 

Was early modern Reformed scholasticism a downgrade from the supposedly more biblical Reformation? Although prior generations of historians have been prone to denigrate scholasticism in the early modern period—including the scholasticism of the Reformed tradition—recent historiography has begun to rehabilitate its legacy. Taking a decidedly appreciative approach, this course will explore scholasticism more generally, scholastic theology, as well as the particular species of Reformed scholasticism. 

Beginning with the various philosophical and theological trajectories navigated by patristic and medieval theologians, this introduction to Reformed scholasticism will look at Christian literature intended to “give a reason for the hope” (1 Pet. 3:15) of the Gospel. To that end, the rise of the academy, functioning as the preeminent place of education for theologians, will lead us to look at early modern educational curriculum and the making of a scholar.

Course readings center around scholastic disputations, commentaries, and other writings which expose students to both early modern Reformed scholastic theology and various controversies surrounding scholasticism found in secondary literature. Finally, the course will include discussion of research method (i.e., how to find, read, and use Reformed scholastic material).

 

Dr. Michael Lynch (Ph.D, Calvin Seminary) teaches Ancient Language and Humanities at Delaware Valley Classical School in New Castle, DE. He is the author of John Davenant’s Hypothetical Universalism: A Defense of Catholic and Reformed Orthodoxy. He and his wife have five children, three girls and two boys.

 


 

Details

Online only, runs 10 weeks, meeting 2 hr./wk. via Zoom. Students will also have the option to participate in class discussion on the Davenant Common Room Discord server. Register to reserve your spot and schedule will be set after a poll of participating students; if the class time does not fit your schedule, you will be eligible for a full refund.

 

This is a graduate-level course. Although a BA is not a necessary pre-requisite for this course, students should come prepared to do graduate-level work.