Church History

The Theological World of the Nicene Controversy (325-407)

This item will be released December 25, 2022.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Hoskin
Runs 1/9 – 3/18/23
$225.00 – $399.00

 

Christians across the major confessions of Christianity—Protestants, Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and the Church of the East all embrace the Nicene Creed as an essential statement of Christian faith and a succinct summary of Christian doctrine. However, in the turbulent fourth century, such a wide-ranging embrace was not the case. In this course, we will explore the theology of the supporters of Nicaea as they sought to articulate and forge orthodox Christianity from the Council of Nicaea in 325 to the death of John Chrysostom in 407. Besides the major arguments for and articulations of orthodox Trinitarian theology, students in this course will also encounter exegesis, spiritual writings, and Christology. Besides the basic contours of the history of the debates, students will read important works of Athanasius of Alexandria, Ephrem the Syrian, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose of Milan, and John Chrysostom. The theologians who fought for Nicaea and who established how to interpret its creed are also among the greatest foundational theologians for Christianity, East and West, Greek, Latin, and Syriac, to this day.

Deadline to register: Wednesday, December 28th

 


 

ENROLLMENT OPTIONS

Auditing ($225):

participate in readings and live class sessions, but no graded assignments and no course credit

Full course (Full-Time Discount) ($275):

for-credit courses (at least four per term) toward our Certificate or M.Litt in Classical Protestantism

Full course ($399):

individual classes on a for-credit basis; you can later apply them toward a Certificate or Degree

 

ENROLL NOW

Description

This Christian History course will be taught by Dr. Matthew Hoskin, and will run from January 9th through March 18th. The syllabus is available here.

Christians across the major confessions of Christianity—Protestants, Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and the Church of the East all embrace the Nicene Creed as an essential statement of Christian faith and a succinct summary of Christian doctrine. However, in the turbulent fourth century, such a wide-ranging embrace was not the case. In this course, we will explore the theology of the supporters of Nicaea as they sought to articulate and forge orthodox Christianity from the Council of Nicaea in 325 to the death of John Chrysostom in 407. Besides the major arguments for and articulations of orthodox Trinitarian theology, students in this course will also encounter exegesis, spiritual writings, and Christology. Besides the basic contours of the history of the debates, students will read important works of Athanasius of Alexandria, Ephrem the Syrian, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose of Milan, and John Chrysostom. The theologians who fought for Nicaea and who established how to interpret its creed are also among the greatest foundational theologians for Christianity, East and West, Greek, Latin, and Syriac, to this day.

Dr. Matthew Hoskin (PhD, University of Edinburgh) teaches ancient and medieval Christian history for Davenant Hall. His research focuses on manuscripts, monks, popes, canon law, and councils, which all feature in his book The Manuscripts of Leo the Great’s Letters (2022), and he blogs about the historic faith at Classically Christian. He lives on Superior’s northern shore in Thunder Bay, Ontario, with his wife and sons.


Details

Online only, runs 10 weeks, meeting 2 hr./wk. via Zoom. Students will also have the option to participate in class discussion on the Davenant Common Room Discord server. Register to reserve your spot and schedule will be set after a poll of participating students; if the class time does not fit your schedule, you will be eligible for a full refund.

This is a graduate-level course. Although a BA is not a necessary pre-requisite for this course, students should come prepared to do graduate-level work.