Ethics, Philosophy

The Nietzche Seminar I

This item will be released December 25, 2022.

Taught by Colin Redemer
Runs 1/9 –  3/18/23
$225.00 – $399.00

 

Perhaps the greatest critic of Christianity and Christendom to arise in the modern era, Nietzsche is too often avoided by Christians who would rather he not have existed. His critique is, if anything, more potent now than it has ever been before, and has much to offer by way of corrective to contemporary Chrsitianity. This class will directly engage Nietzsche’s central works Beyond Good and Evil, and The Genealogy of Morality as well as other selected readings including The Birth of Tragedy, and Thus Spake Zarathustra.

 

Deadline to register: Wednesday, December 28th

 


 

ENROLLMENT OPTIONS

Auditing ($225):

participate in readings and live class sessions, but no graded assignments and no course credit

Full course (Full-Time Discount) ($275):

for-credit courses (at least four per term) toward our Certificate or M.Litt in Classical Protestantism

Full course ($399):

individual classes on a for-credit basis; you can later apply them toward a Certificate or Degree

 

ENROLL NOW

Description

This Philosophy course will be taught by Colin Redemer, and will run from January 9 through March 18. The syllabus will be posted when available.

Nietzsche is among the most influential philosophers of modernity. In Leo Strauss’ famous essay “Three Waves of Modernity” he gives Nietzsche the honor of being the thinker who summons modernity’s third, and most devastating, wave. He was also perhaps the greatest critic of Christianity and Christendom to arise in the modern era. It is perhaps for this last reason that Nietzsche is often avoided by Christians who would rather he not have existed. God, however, in his providence looked down at Nietzsche and, in his love, said “How good that you exist.” In this class, while we will not be reading Nietzsche to side with Nietzsche, we will read him and, siding with God, see what his insights into philosophy and human psychology can offer the Christian who finds himself in modernity’s midst.

Nietzsche’s critique is, if anything, more potent now than it has ever been before. The church does indeed seem weak. There is a question about whether our society has become weak as a result of the influence of the gospel. And there are ever growing questions about what good the natural, and even bodily, human goods are. This class will directly engage Nietzsche’s central works Beyond Good and Evil, and The Genealogy of Morality as well as other selected readings including The Birth of Tragedy, and Thus Spake Zarathustra. Poison, in controlled doses, often has unexpected medicinal properties. We will read Nietzsche with an eye to the ways in which, perhaps, he can help correct errors which have cropped up in our own communities and practices and used as a corrective medicine to reorient the Christian life on the bedrock of the gospel. In the face of a rising and explicit paganism, the return of the cult of strength, and the advent of an awareness of the impact and potential meanings of power it is high time Christians took a critical look at ourselves and our world. Nietzsche, the critic, may turn out to be our friend, even if he cannot ultimately be our teacher, nor we his disciples.

Colin Redemer is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Saint Mary’s College of California and Vice-President of the Davenant Institute. He loves teaching on the intersection between History, Philosophy, Literature, and Christianity. His writing has appeared in the Englewood Review of Books, Evansville Review, Sojourners Magazine, The Federalist, and the Tampa Review.


Details

Online only, runs 10 weeks, meeting 2 hr./wk. via Zoom. Students will also have the option to participate in class discussion on the Davenant Common Room Discord server. Register to reserve your spot and schedule will be set after a poll of participating students; if the class time does not fit your schedule, you will be eligible for a full refund.

This is a graduate-level course. Although a BA is not a necessary pre-requisite for this course, students should come prepared to do graduate-level work.