Dogmatics

Impassibility and Passions of God

This item will be released December 25, 2022.

Taught by Ryan Hurd
Runs 1/9 – 3/18/2023
$225.00 – $399.00

 

God is not passible and has many passions. This course considers these two, impassibility and passions, as said of God. Today, needless to say, much misunderstanding reigns on both of these issues: there are classical theists who say God is impassible and does not have passions, and relational theists who say that God has passions (often called “emotions”) and is not impassible. Each is somewhat correct and neither is entirely correct. The position of the catholic church has always been very clear: theologians not only negate passions of God but also affirm passions of God. Understanding how this is remains crucial for many areas of theology. This course explains how these things are in God, and uses impassibility and passions as examples of the mode of how theology is done, broadly speaking. We will also consider something of the development of these names in the catholic tradition, and address contemporary departures on both sides of these questions.

Deadline to register: Wednesday, December 28th

 


 

ENROLLMENT OPTIONS

Auditing ($225):

participate in readings and live class sessions, but no graded assignments and no course credit

Full course (Full-Time Discount) ($275):

for-credit courses (at least four per term) toward our Certificate or M.Litt in Classical Protestantism

Full course ($399):

individual classes on a for-credit basis; you can later apply them toward a Certificate or Degree

 

ENROLL NOW

Description

This Dogmatics course will be taught by Ryan Hurd, and will run from January 9 through March 18th. The syllabus is available here.

God is not passible and has many passions. This course considers these two, impassibility and passions, as said of God.

Although this course is theology, nonetheless we follow Thomas insofar as he says, on the one hand, that God is not passible, and on the other that God has passions. Today, needless to say, much misunderstanding reigns on both these issues: there are classical theists who say God is impassible and does not have passions, and relational theists who say that God has passions (or “emotions”) and is not impassible. This course will demonstrate that from the perspective of Thomas and the tradition of catholic theology, each is somewhat correct and neither is entirely correct. The position of the catholic church has always been very clear: theologians not only negate passions of God but also affirm passions of God. Understanding how this is remains crucial for many areas of theology. This course explains how these things are in God, and uses impassibility and passions as examples of the mode of how theology is done, broadly speaking. We will also consider something of the development of these names in the catholic tradition, and address contemporary departures on both sides of these questions.

Ryan Hurd is a systematic theologian whose area of expertise is doctrine of God, specifically the Trinity. His primary training is in the high medievals and early modern scholastics as well as the 20th century ressourcement movement. He has written a number of articles and regularly does translations of early modern theology sources; but his primary project is writing a systematics of the Trinity. He is currently a doctoral student at Theologische Universiteit Kampen.


Details

Online only, runs 10 weeks, meeting 2 hr./wk. via Zoom. Students will also have the option to participate in class discussion on the Davenant Common Room Discord server. Register to reserve your spot and schedule will be set after a poll of participating students; if the class time does not fit your schedule, you will be eligible for a full refund.

This is a graduate-level course. Although a BA is not a necessary pre-requisite for this course, students should come prepared to do graduate-level work.